Welcome to the Toutle Valley!

I'm starting this blog to help visitors find the many things to do around Mount St. Helens and the Toutle Valley.  Our area is surrounded by adventure, high and low, but it's sometimes genuinely hard to find information about these special places.  Before our volcano erupted, the Spirit Lake Hwy followed the Toutle River all the way to Spirit Lake and Mount St. Helens with easy-to-find adventure around every bend.  The route was lined with campgrounds, river access, logging roads, trails open to all,  and vast areas to explore. 

Today its different--With all the passes, permits, and rules, it's a tangle of red tape to just understand where you can go for a walk.  Don't dispair!  I know all the secrets... and I might even be asking for your help to make the area more accessible. 

Consider this blog your Insider's Guide to the Toutle Valley.  

Posted By Toutle Trekker

This is just a quick heads-up if you are drving into the mountains and rural areas in the next few months.  Deer are out on the roads, in the roads, along the sides of the roads, and they are acting stupid.  There are two main reasons right now, in the spring and early summer, to be on the lookout for deer in the road.

1) Yearlings have just been kicked out by mom.  You will see packs of two or three young, stupid, yearlings wandering without much knowledge or direction.  If one crosses in front of you, watch for the second and third behind.

2) Fawns are out in force.  These new tiny babies are out now with mom, and they don't know about cars yet.  Just yesterday, I honked at a mom and twins loitering in South Toutle Road on a blind corner.  The UPS truck was beeping away at my driveway at another doe with twin fawns.  Sometime these babies even lie down in the middle of the road as a way to escape cars!

Just driving between Toutle and Castle Rock I encountered about about twenty deer crossing, loitering, watching, strolling and wandering in the local roads and highways.  Watch out for deer as you drive. 


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

I wanted this story be about success.  I've been waiting to write for two years now, working behind the scenes.  It should have been a snap, easy-peezy.  Just one phone call and the illegal "no trespassing" signs come down, the public is allowed back in, all is operating as intended (and required).  Unfortunately, it hasn't quite work out that way.    

Posted Gate
I discovered that 260 acres of public land on the Toutle River was (is) being improperly restricted.  The land is accessed by a legal, written easement "for all road purposes associated with the ownership of the land".  Instead, the access road is gated and posted with bold "no trespassing" signs.  It should be a simple fix:   The land is in public hands and is dedicated to public use.  It was given, free of charge, to the local Conservation District by the state of Washington with along with this access road easement.   I have a copy of the easement; I have the deed requirements that outline how the land must be used. These include a provision specifically requiring uninterrupted river recreational access.  Don't take my word for it.  These documents are on the county's property website at the bottom under "conveyances" for everyone to see.

Cowlitz Property Info | Properties Listing Grid (cowlitzinfo.net

I contacted the Conservation District and made presentations.  I pointed out all the multiple agency goals for public access to our rivers and public lands. It seemed like such a little thing, an easy no-brainer win for recreation. JUST CHANGE SOME SIGNS.  But nothing is simple when dealing with Weyerhaeuser.

 It seems the mega-corporation--the largest landowner in the United States--will not allow anyone access on that 260 acres accept their paying clients.   All recreationists in the West know about how private land can block public land, giving exclusive access to private interests.  This is exactly what is happening here, with the recreational lease-holder of Weyerhaeuser's getting exclusive access to that 260 acres.  The Conservation District managing the land (with conflict of interest up to their eyeballs) doesn't want to ruffle the feathers of a powerful corporation that owns nearly half of Cowlitz County.  I've called and clawed and complained for two years now.   And what outrageous thing am I asking?  Change the "No Trespassing" signs on the gate to  "non-motorized access allowed", which is the way it was before Weyerhaeuser started their recreation fee program.  I haven't ask to open the road to vehicles, or to remove the gate, just modify the sign, and simply allow the public access to public land to walk, bicycle or horseback ride that easement route to public land.  But no.  Nope.  No way.  Big W wants to control not only their land, but everyone else's too.  The agency, after nearly two years of prodding, reluctantly asked the company about the issue, but was told in a fashion to "sit down and shut up", which they dutifully did.   Both the Consevation District and Weyerhaeuser are much more concerned about keeping the public from wandering onto the lease, than the public's right to access public land via a public easement.  And consequently, the lease holder gets virtual exclusive access to the public's land.  

Since these threatening signs are designed to keep regular hunters and anglers from legally accessing public land, they may actually be a violation of Washington law! (RCW 77.15.210) To paraphrase, it is illegal tharass, intimidate, interfere with or disrupt the lawful pursuit of hunting and fishing.  How is posting a legal access route to a river with public land NOT a violation of this law?

easement blocked
So what to do?  I'll keep chugging along, bringing the issue to more and more public officials.  Maybe someone, somewhere out there cares about the publics' rights, too.  If you know of such a person, please pass this on...


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

Imagine the ideal State park.  Of course there would be camping and the typical marshmallow-coated fun, but my “dream” park would have things to do year round.  In summer I could camp, bicycle, or hike the park’s trails, and in the winter I could snowshoe, sled, or cross-country ski there.  The best parks also have water.  I would connect my “dream” park with a beautiful lake.  Don’t forget the fish, because I love fishing…and make them big.  Add features like a boat launch, trails, restrooms, and picnic area at the lake.  It’s nice when camping to have park paths connect with larger trail systems.  Wake up in the morning and leave the tent or RV and hike or bicycle past the lake and deep in the backcountry.  The park should be fairly large, at several hundred acres, and easy to get to.  Make it on a paved road, and not too far to drive, perhaps near a national treasure that is already attracting visitors.  Put it near a science center and a visitor center for extra pizazz.  It helps if the land is already public, and wrap it all in a spectacular view.  That is my ideal park ...and here it is:

 

DNR land could make a great park
320 acres of isolated and unused state Department of Natural Resources land sits surrounded by the Mount St Helens National Monument.  In fact, all of the maps on Monument billboards have the land marked as part of the Monument.  It isn’t.  State law allows DNR land to be transferred or leased for park and recreation purposes. 

The land is hilly, but not steep, and could support a camping park, snow park, day-use area, or a combination of all of these.  Old logging roads lead to both Coldwater Lake and the Castle Lake viewpoint and toward Elk Rock.  These old roads could easily be converted to trails, linking with the Pacific Crest Trail and the Boundary National Scenic Trail.  Coldwater Lake has full facilities and would be a short two-mile walk, snowshoe, bicycle, ski or jog away.   But for now its just a dream...


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

Where is the missing top of Mount St. Helens?  Many people think that the top of the volcano was blasted into the sky and became the cloud of ash that circled the world.  But that isn't true.  The ash that was erupted was "new" material from deep within the earth.  The "old" top of Mount St. Helens slid into the Toutle River Valley.  This landslide filled the valley up to 300 feet deep with chunks of the old summit.  The material consisted of loose layers of rock and ash along with pieces of glacier.  The largest mudflow resulted from the de-watering of this huge landslide. These "lahars" inundated all the low lying areas along the Toutle, filled the Cowlitz, and clogged the Columbia River shipping channel.  

In response, mass-dredging ensued. The Army Corps of Engineers also quickly built a sediment dam across the North Toutle valley in an attempt to hold the material in place.  This first dam (called N-1) was quickly overwhelmed.  Over the years, the Toutle River has continued to erode this material downstream, creating big problems for people along the river.  The sand along the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers is old ash and rock from volcanic activity.

In 1990 the Corps came up with a solution.  They would build one huge sediment dam on the North Toutle and stop the erosion! The idea was simple; slow the river down with a shallow lake behind a big dam.  The sand drops out, and the water flows out over a spillway.  Now towns could be safe. Cowlitz County lifted the building moratorium on mudflow areas and housing developments popped up along our rivers, protected by the dam and higher levies. 

Anyone could see, however, that this "solution" didn't stabilize the river or get rid of the landslide material, it just held it in the upper valley a little longer.  And that is where we are today.  The dam is full, the river above the dam has become a shallow bay of mud, and the Cowlitz River is still clogged with sand.  The Toutle has no stable channel, and wanders over the sediment plain, now picking up material and moving it downstream.  The spillway on the dam has already been raised once to hold more material, with two more raises planned.  Oh, and the dam has no fish ladder.  Returning endangered salmon must be trucked around the mess.  Baby salmon (smolts) must navigate a web of shallow muddy channels downstream on their way to the ocean. Recently, agencies have tried a few creative ideas to hold sediment in place and to reduce the erosive action of the river.  You can see log dikes and piles along the Toutle River in places like Harry Gardner Park or the Mudflow Wildife Area.  These features are designed to improve fish habitat and hold the loose material in place long enough for vegetation to establish.

Learn More: https://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/mount-st-helens/overview/

See it:  Harry Gardner Park is the best place to see the erosion control and habitat enhancement structures.  Along Interstate 5, north of Castle Rock, you may notice large piles of dredge spoils along the Toutle and Cowlitz River.  Some of these sites are publicly owned.  In the upper Toutle Valley,  scan the sediment plain with binoculars for log structure and other erosion control measures. From the Hoffstadt Bridge area the remains of N-1 dam are visible in the valley.  

Trail across sediment dam
 

Hike it:  From Kid Valley travel east on 504 to Sediment Dam Road, which is actually the old Spirit Lake Highway.  Travel about 2 miles to the parking lot at the end.  The trail starts past the restroom, and leads to a dam viewpoint and continues to the dam itself.  It's a nice walk, half on dirt trail and half on old road.
The view from the dam shows the massive expanse of sediment held in place there.  Elk are also common, so be aware.  Sometimes herds of elk graze in the grassy field around the dam.  If you follow the signs and the old roads, the hike makes a nice 1.2 mile loop.  

 


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

With the upcoming hunting season in "sight", my family headed to the local shooting range to "scope" out our rifles.  (Puns intended!)  We had never been there before, and I was a bit uneasy about practicing at an official range.  But with smoke around and high fire danger the range was a better choice for practicing instead of the family's tree farm.  Afterward, we were all glad we tried the official route for sighting in our deer rifles.  It was so much fun that we have added a new activity for rainy days this winter, too.

The Cowlitz Public Shooting Range is operated by the Cowlitz Game and Angler's Club, but is owned by Cowlitz County Parks.  It is located at the end of Toutle Park Road on spoils dredged from the Toutle River.  As you shoot here, you are standing on the old top of Mount St. Helens which traveled down the river as a massive mudflow.   The US Army Corps of Engineers acquired several areas of property to store this mountain of sand and ash, and when all that work was completed the land was given to the County Parks for a public purpose.  The site is ideal, since the sandy mudflow material could be piled and scooped to form the backstops and berms needed for a range.

 As one would imagine, getting a new gun range started is a red-tape nightmare, and it took years of grants, volunteer hours, unexpected expenses, forty-four special provisions, lawsuit threats, and political name calling to see this new range built.  But, with partnerships and dedication, and a last second donation of large equipment hours, the range was finally opened to use in 2013.  (If you are interested in backstory politics, just search the archives of The Longview Daily News.)

When you arrive at the range, the volunteers will fill you in on all the safety procedures.  It takes a few "rounds" to fully understand the rules, some of which seem arbitrary, like do not touch paper targets during a no shooting time, but there is a good reason for each one.  Children and spectators are allowed, and since the shooting shed is open, face coverings are not required if six feet can be maintained.  Be sure to bring your own firearm and targets along with ear and eye protection.  The shooting benches are very solid, and sandbags are also available.  Targets can be set out between 50 to 300 yards, and there are seperate pistol and long-gun areas.  The range is currently applying for a state grant to expand the trap shooting area.  Check out the details at the range's website.

http://cowlitzshootingrange.com/

 

 

 
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