Welcome to the Toutle Valley!

I'm starting this blog to help visitors find the many things to do around Mount St. Helens and the Toutle Valley.  Our area is surrounded by adventure, high and low, but it's sometimes genuinely hard to find information about these special places.  Before our volcano erupted, the Spirit Lake Hwy followed the Toutle River all the way to Spirit Lake and Mount St. Helens with easy-to-find adventure around every bend.  The route was lined with campgrounds, river access, logging roads, trails open to all,  and vast areas to explore. 

Today its different--With all the passes, permits, and rules, it's a tangle of red tape to just understand where you can go for a walk.  Don't dispair!  I know all the secrets... and I might even be asking for your help to make the area more accessible. 

Consider this blog your "insider's guide" to the Toutle Valley.  

Posted By Toutle Trekker

 

This is a photo of my first Toutle River Chinook salmon.  What a fun fight, as it beat for the rapids and I ended up with tired arms and wet feet, but I landed it. Unfortunatley, the season had just closed to keeping chinook, so I let it go--right after the photo!.  Now all hatchery fish on the Green River have a clipped addipose fin.  (note the intact adipose on this fish).

Chinook
August 1 marks the start of salmon season on the Toutle River system,.  As with steelhead, you will need a Washington state fishing license, a Columbia River endorsement, and a punchcard with salmon as an optionn.  Drews grocery can get you fixed up with all of these documents.  

The rivers might be open, but the salmon don't show up unless we get some rain.  The first fall fish to arrive will be Fall Chinook (aka Kings) headed for the Green River Fish Hatchery.  Then, if we are lucky, the silvers (aka coho) come with the next batch of rain.  Like most fishing, timing is everything.  You want rain, but not so much rain that the rivers turn to chocolate milk.  Sometimes dedicated anglers spend an entire month at Kid Valley Campground, which is a short drive from the mouth of the Green River, where many folks try their luck.  

Again, the rules are complex, especially around the hatchery.  It is so complex there that I feel there should be an accredited course put on by the locak Junior College in "fishing regulations".  To be safe, use single barbless hooks with no bait, something like number 4 Blue Fox spinners in various colors.  Salmon move through fishing holes, so you can spend several hours working one hole.  It can get frustrating seing salmon jump and splash all around you but they refuse to bite.  Because of the temptation to "snag", gear rules get more restrictive near the hatchery during prime fihing time.  Carry the regulations with you.  Anything you catch with an adipose fin must be released and not removed from the water.  Bag limits and species are in the rules, but generally only hatchery coho, chinook and hatchery steelhead can be kept.  The rules sometimes change mid-stream mid-season, so check the WDFW website for updates before you head out. 

The same areas I described in earlier posts for swimming and steelhead work for salmon, too. 


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

It is HOT out there, so where can visitors go to cool off and take a swim around here? 

Coldwater Lake: Yes, you can swim here and it is popular with non-gas powered boats and kayaks.  For swimming, the Forest Service has the shore access very limited, but you may walk the shore below the high water mark from either the boat launch or the "Discovery Area"  along the outlet.  Do not use the boardwalks or boat launch to access the lake for swimming.  There is an additional water access with a restroom one mile up the Lakes Trail.  The lake is very close (jumping distance) from the trail in an additional location along hike.  The best official water access spot is near the end of the lake, at three miles.  Here there is a nice beach with good swimming or fishing access.

Silver Lake:  Great for boating and kayaking but not so great anymore for swimming and waterskiing.  These days the warm weather and shallow, nutrient rich water means nasty, and sometimes dangerous, algal blooms.  ***August 2018 Update: Water is dangerous due to toxic algae. Warnings posted**  Access points; Kerr Road boat launch, Canal Road culvert accessed via Sightly Road.

Toutle River: The Toutle is a system of several rivers, the North, South and Mainstem Toutle.  Because Harry Gardner County Park sits at the forks, it provides public access to all three segments. Across from Drews Grocery, take South Toutle Road three miles to the bridge over the S. Toutle.  Public land extends from the bridge downstream to the junction with the North Toutle, and beyond.  Cowlitz County also owns land on the North Fork here, that enters the South Fork from the east.  These rivers are prone to wander, and the swimming and fishing holes change yealry (along with the ownership of the bottom).

South Toutle: The bulk of the South Toutle River can be accessed via Weyerhaeuser logging road 4100, which is open to the public and parallels the river for miles before it is gated for permit holders only.  Follow South Toutle Rd, past Harry Park about 1 1/2 miles, to a very wide gravel road on the right.  Take that road and follow it along the river.  Most side roads are gated (except a few heading uphill).  Most pullouts have angler trails that head to fishing and swimming holes.

Mainstem Toutle: Tower Road crosses the mainstem Toutle River at a WDFW access area.  Sometimes experienced boaters float "Hollywood Gorge" between the Spirit Lake Hwy Bridge and Tower Road Bridge.  During high water the Gorge is quite dangerous with class V rapids.  With the murky water hiding submerged logs, people have died tubing or floating the Gorge even in summer. Beware.

North Toutle:  Toward Kid Valley the North Fork Toutle can be accessed via the 1900 logging road below Kid Valley Campground.  Park near the bridge below 19 Mile House.  The North Toutle can be muddy at times, and watch out for unseen hazards.  Further up river, across from the Buried A-frame, the river can be access as well.  The public owns land at the fish collection facility, which drops to the left just before the next bridge (if you get to Sediment Dam Road you've gone to far).  The North Fork can also be waded here to get to the Green River Fish Hatchery. 

Green River: On this same 1900 road follow the ungated logging roads up, down, and around to the Green River Fish Hatchery.  Fishing rules here get complex, and it gets pretty crazy when the salmon are running, but on a hot July or August day, the river is accessible for wading and swimming.  Be sure to check out the viewing area and the downstream end of the hatchery.  Salmon congregate here.

A note about navigability and ownership of shorelands.  In the state of Washington, the public owns the beds and shores of navigible waters.  The courts have decided that if a river was used, or could be used, to float shake and shingle bolts in the past, it is "navigible".  All of these rivers were used for moving shake bolts in the late 1800's and early 1900's, so if push came to shove, courts would probably consider them navigible.  Unfortunately, timber companies have been selling off and parcelling out our rivers over the last decade.  Newcomers may not realize that the public has access to the river below the high water mark.  Additionally our rivers move dramatically, and the bed of a river as it sat at statehood in 1889, could be where the public ownership still lies, sometimes high and dry.  Its a confusing mess, but the areas I have mentioned have public lands, stable channels, or a long tradition of public use. 


 
Posted By Toutle Trekker

The swallows and their feathered friends are starting to arrive in the lowlands of the Toutle Valley.   Each morning it seems I hear a new migrant that has completed the long journey from the tropics.  With snow still hanging on in the mountains, it's a good time to talk about "birding" opportunities in the Valley.  With Silver Lake, Seaquest State Park, and the varied habitat near Johnston Ridge, the Toutle Valley is a great area for both beginning and advanced birders.  Today I will talk about the birding and wildlife viewing opportunities around Silver Lake.

Where to go:

Seaquest State Park:  Silver Lake has great opportunities to find wetland species.  Start at the Mount St. Helens Visitor Center, where a boardwalk trail follows the edge of the lake on an old railroad grade.  Several miles of looping trails across the highway in Seaquest State Park provide classic older forest habitat. 

Hall Road WDFW units:  There are also some hidden parcels of state wildlife land toward the east end of the lake.  About 1/4 mile east of Hall Road, watch for a small, grassy parking area on the left (north).  With your Discover Pass or WDFW vehicle pass, park here and follow elk trails to the edge of the cattail marshes.  Rubber boots are helpful.  This quiet edge is a birding gem, with waterfowl and brushy habitats for wood warblers and forest dwellers. 

Canal Road: The WDFW Canal Road unit is perhaps the best birding and wildife viewing spot on the lake.  Across from Drew's Grocery, turn right (south) onto Sightly Road.  Watch for swallows, and kestrels on the powerlines, and waterfowl in the flooded fields along the road.  For the last several springs, four or five pairs of wood ducks have been stopping in the flooded fields on their way to nesting areas.  At the sharp corner (1 1/2 miles) veer right onto Canal Road, past more flooded fields, and go straight at the first junction, where the road narrows.  The Wildlife Area is the wetlands on both sides of the road.  Explore up to a gate and parking area on a small rise.  Besides birds, don't be surprised to spot elk, blacktailed deer, beavers or otters, and wild horses.  Fishing access is also available, and there are areas where small boats can reach Silver Lake. No passes required here or Canal Road.

Canal Rd

The flooded farmer's fields along Moore Road are also good places to spot waterfowl from the road. 

Silver Lake Dam: This spot is for the brave and adventurous and a GPS is helpful to stay on public land. More WDFW land is accessible from Hansen Road, across from the Toutle Highschool softball fields.  Follow Hansen Road approxiamately a half mile until it swings left, just before crossing the Outlet Creek.  A gated gravel road leads through private land on an easement, to the Silver Lake Flood Control dam and more WDFW land.  The high school track team sometimes keeps the trail/road open for running. 

This link identifies the Department of Wildlife land parcels at Silver Lake: Canal and Hall Road Units.  Follow the links to "detailed land ownership map"

https://wdfw.wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/county/Cowlitz/


 

 

 
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